Self-hosted password manager: installing Passbolt on FreeBSD

Arthur Duarte CC-BY-SA-4.0

Arthur Duarte CC-BY-SA-4.0

Password managers, or password safes, are an important thing these days. With the constant pressure we (IT people) put our users under to setup a different password for every single registration/application/web site, it's the best, if not only, way to keep track of these secrets. On one hand, the isolated client-side software can be really powerful and/or well integrated with the OS or the software ecosystem of the user, but it lacks the modern touch of "cloud" that makes your data available anywhere and anytime. On the other hand, a full commercial package will come with client for every device you own, and a monthly fee for cloud synchronization, but you have absolutely no control over your data (just imagine that tomorrow the company you rely on goes bankrupt).
Better safe than sorry: I don't rely on cloud services. It comes at a cost, but it's quite rewarding to show the world another way exists.
Disclaimer: I don't give a sh*t about smartphones, so my needs are computer-centric.

In order to store passwords, and more generally speaking "secrets", in such a way that I can access them anywhere/anytime, I've tried Passbolt. Passbolt is an OpenSource self-hosted password manager, written in PHP/Javascript with a database back end. Hence, install and config are not for the average Joe. On the user side it's quite clean and surprisingly stable for alpha software. So once a LAMP admin has finished installing the server part, any non-skilled user can register and start storing passwords.

Enough chit-chat, let's install.

My initial setup was a vanilla FreeBSD 10.3 install, so I've had to make everything. I won't replay every single step here, especially on the configuration side.

Prerequisites:

pkg install apache24
pkg install mod_php56
pkg install php56-gd
pkg install pecl-memcached
pkg install mysql57-server
pkg install pecl-gnupg
pkg install git
pkg install php56-pdo_mysql
pkg install sudo
pkg install php56-openssl
pkg install php56-ctype
pkg install php56-filter

Everything else should come as a dependency.

Tuning:

Apache must allow .htaccess, so you'll have to put an AllowOverride All somewhere in your configuration. You must also load the Rewrite module. Also, go now for SSL (letsencrypt is free and supported). Non-SSL install of Passbolt are for demo purpose only.
Apache will also need to execute gnupg commands, meaning the www user needs an extended $PATH. The Apache startup script provided on FreeBSD sources Apache environment variables from /usr/local/sbin/envvars and this very file sources every /usr/local/etc/apache24/envvars.d/*.env, so I've created mine:

$ cat /usr/local/etc/apache24/envvars.d/path.env
PATH=/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/games:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin

You also need to tune your MySQL server. If you choose the 5.7, you must edit it's configuration. Just add the following line into [mysqld] section of /usr/local/etc/mysql/my.cnf:

sql_mode = 'STRICT_TRANS_TABLES,NO_ZERO_IN_DATE,NO_ZERO_DATE,ERROR_FOR_DIVISION_BY_ZERO,NO_AUTO_CREATE_USER,NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION'

This is due to a bug in Passbolt and could be useless in a not to distant future.

Install recipe:

You can now follow the install recipe at https://www.passbolt.com/help/tech/install.
Generating the GPG key is quite straightforward but you have to keep in mind that Apache's user (www) will need access to the keyring. So if you create this key and keyring with a different user, you'll have to mv and chown -R www the full .gnupg directory somewhere www can read it (outside DocumentRoot is perfectly fine).

Use git to retrieve the application code into appropriate path (according to your Apache config):

mv /usr/local/www
git clone https://github.com/passbolt/passbolt.git

Edit php files as per the documentation.

Beware the install script: make sure you chown -R www the whole passbolt directory before using cake install.
On FreeBSD you won't be able to use su to run the install script, because www's account is locked. You can use sudo instead:

sudo -u www app/Console/cake install --no-admin

Same for the admin account creation:

sudo -u www app/Console/cake passbolt register_user -u patpro@example.com -f Pat -l Pro -r admin

Follow the end of the install doc, and you should be ok. Install the Firefox passbolt extension into your browser, and point to your server.

I'm pretty happy with passbolt so far. I'll have to install a proper production server, with SSL and all, but features are very appealing, the passbolt team is nice and responsive, and the roadmap is loaded with killing features. Yeah BRING ME 2FA \o/.

Escaping the Apple ecosystem: a view of the setup

Here is a quick & dirty view of the physical and logical setup of my new workstation. The linux part is not finished yet (no drivers for Radeon GPU, thank you Ubuntu), it's a work in progress.

esx
Not depicted: each USB controller sports 4 USB ports (yellow) or 2 USB ports (pink and blue). It allows me to plug few devices that won't be "managed" by the USB switch.
USB devices plugged-in on the switch are made available to only one VM at a time. When I press the switch button, they disappear for the current VM and are presented to the next one.

Escaping the Apple ecosystem: part 3

In part 2, I was able to create and use a Windows 7 VM with the Radeon R9 270x in passthrough. It works really great. But OSX and Linux where more difficult to play with.

List of virtual machines

List of virtual machines


Since then, I've made tremendous progress: I've managed to run an OSX 10.11.6 VM properly, but more importantly, I've managed to run my native Mac OS X 10.6.8 system as a VM, with the Mac's Radeon in passthrough.
I've removed my Mac OS X SSD and the Mac's graphics card from the Mac Pro tower, and installed them into the PC tower. Then I've created the VM for the 10.6.8 system, configured ESXi to use Mac's Radeon with VT-d, etc.
The only real problem here is that adding a PCI card into the PC tower makes PCI device numbers change: it breaks almost every passthrough already configured. I had to remake VT-d config for the Windows VM. Apart from that, it went smoothly.
Currently, I'm working on my native 10.6.8 system, that runs as a VM, and the Windows VM is playing my music (because the Realtek HD audio controller is dedicated to the Windows VM).
Moving from a Mac Pro with 4-core 2.8 GHz Xeon to a 6-core 3.5 GHz Core i7 really gives a boost to my old 10.6.8 system.

Running both OSes, the box is almost as silent as the Mac Pro while packing almost twice as more raw CPU power and 2.7x more GPU power.

The Mac Pro is now empty: no disks, no graphics card, and will probably go on sale soon.

to-do list:

  • secure the whole infrastructure ;
  • install 2nd-hand MSI R9 270x when it's delivered ;
  • properly setup Linux to use AMD graphics card.

I might also add few SSDs and a DVD burner before year's end.

Escaping the Apple ecosystem: part 2

In part 1, I've written about the BoM of my project and the associated to-do list.
First item on this list was: build the box. That did not go as smoothly as expected. The motherboard was not fully operational: after few minutes of run time (between 5 and 30), it would trigger a CPU overheat alarm, even when the CPU was idle and cool. Supermicro's Support made me tried a new BIOS, with no effect, so I've finally send the board for exchange. The new board arrived but I've had to delay the rebuilt for few weeks.
Now the PC is up and running. The new motherboard seems to work great, but I've not tested IPMI yet. IPMI was the very first feature I've used on the first board, and there is a slight probability that the CPU overheat problem comes from a probe malfunction related to the BMC. Let's keep that for later.

I've chosen to run this box on VMware ESXi 5.5, because it's quite common (more than the latest 6.x), because it sports features I need like passthrough, and because most VMware based multi-sit PC projects like mine are using ESXi 5.x.

ESXi is quite easy to install, I won't give details. Main hdd in the box is installed with ESXi, which is configured thanks to a USB keyboard and a display plugged in the VGA port of the motherboard. After basic configuration (network, user password...), I've switched to remote configuration through VSphere Client, installed on a Windows PC (really a VM running on the Mac).

General view

General view of ESX's configuration


Configuring passthrough for GPUs is pretty straightforward, because I've started with only one GPU, and because these are discrete PCI cards. On the other hand, passthrough of USB controller can be tricky: many controllers, nothing to identify them except trial & error (unless you have the blueprint for your motherboard telling what physical USB ports belong to what controller).
Go to configuration tab, then "Advanced", and finally click "edit" on the right

Go to configuration tab, then "Advanced", and finally click "edit" on the right


When you click "Edit…" a window opens that lists interesting devices you can try to passthrough.
Choose some. Then you have to reboot the ESXi and add some of these devices to a VM.
passthrough
I've created a Windows 7 pro 64bits VM, with raw device mapping pointing to an SSD. I've added every available PCI devices to this VM (USB, sound, GPU) and installed Windows plus updates.
It's important to remember that initially, most PCI devices might not work at all because of missing drivers on guest OS (here it's Windows). Hence, after installing Windows, the Radeon was detected but not used, and only Intel USB controllers where working. I've installed AMD drivers, and ASMedia drivers (courtesy of Supermicro). I've also installed VMware Tools.
After all this, the Windows VM properly uses my Dell display hocked-up on the MSI R9 270x Radeon, and I can interact with the system thanks to a real keyboard and mouse. Passing through the whole USB controller allows me to use any USB device I want. I've successfully plugged-in and used a thumbdrive, a USB gaming headset and a USB hub.
I've made some GPU/CPU benchmarks and everything looks perfect. I've tested Left 4 Dead 2 game play, and it looked great too (I'll probably have to tweak anti aliasing settings to make it perfect).

The Windows part was quite fast to setup, and is almost done now. I've started to fight with OSX and Ubuntu, but things are not easy with both of them. It looks like my 3 years old graphics card it so new that OSX does not support it until 10.11.x, and Ubuntu won't allow me to install Radeon drivers on 16.x LTS because they wait for some software to stabilize before packaging it…

To-do list:

  • fix problems with OSX and Ubuntu virtualization
  • find another MSI Radeon R9 270X GAMING 2G (of course it's no longer in stock…)
  • fully test Mac OS X 10.6.8 with Mac's graphics card instead of MSI Radeon

Cracking passwords: testing PCFG password guess generator

Cracking passwords is a kind of e-sport, really. There's competition among amateurs and professionals "players", tools, gear. There are secrets, home-made recipes, software helpers, etc.
One of this software is PCFG password guess generator, for "Probabilistic Context-Free Grammar". I won't explain the concept of PCFG, some scientific literature exists you can read to discover all the math inside.
PCFG password guess generator comes as two main python programs: pcfg_trainer.py and pcfg_manager.py. Basic mechanism is the following:
- you feed pcfg_trainer.py with enough known passwords to generate comprehensive rules describing the grammar of known passwords, and supposedly unknown passwords too.
- you run pcfg_manager.py, using previously created grammar, to create millions of password candidates to feed into your favorite password cracker (John the Ripper, Hashcat…).

In order to measure PCFG password guess generator's efficiency I've made few tests. Here is my setup:

  • Huge password dump, 117205873 accounts with 61829207 unique Raw-SHA1 hashes;
  • John the Ripper, Bleeding Jumbo, downloaded 20160728, compiled on FreeBSD 10.x;
  • PCFG password guess generator, downloaded 20160801, launched with Python 3.x;

Here's my methodology:

Of these 61829207 hashes, about 35 millions are already cracked. I've extracted a random sample of 2 millions known passwords to feed the trainer. Then I've used pcfg_manager.py to create a 10 millions lines word list. I've also trimmed the famous Rockyou list to it's 10 millions first lines, to provide a known reference.

Finally, I've launched this shell script:

#!/bin/sh
for i in none wordlist jumbo; do
  ./john --wordlist=pcfg_crckr --rules=$i --session=pcfg_cracker-$i --pot=pcfg_cracker-$i.pot HugeDump
  ./john --wordlist=ry10m --rules=$i --session=ry10m-$i --pot=ry10m-$i.pot HugeDump
done

No forking, I'm running on one CPU core here. Each word list is tested three times, with no word mangling rules, with defaults JtR rules, and finally with Jumbo mangling rules.

Some results (number of cracked passwords):

Rules PCFG Rockyou
none 4409362 2774971
wordlist 5705502 5005889
Jumbo 21146209 22781889

That I can translate into efficiency, where efficiency is Cracked/WordlistLength as percentage:

Rules PCFG Rockyou
none 44.1% 27.7%
wordlist 57.1% 50.1%
Jumbo 211.5% 227.8%

It's quite interesting to see that the PCFG generated word list has a very good efficiency, compared to Rockyou list, when no rules are involved. That's to be expected, as PCFG password guess generator has been trained with a quite large sample of known passwords from the same dump I am attacking.
Also, the PCFG password guess generator creates candidates that are not very well suited for mangling, and only the jumbo set of rules achieves good results with this source. Rockyou on the other hand starts quite low with only 27.7% but jumps to 50.1% with common rules, and finally defeats PCFG when used with jumbo rules.

On the word list side, Rockyou is known and limited: it will never grow. But PCFG password guess generator looks like it can create an infinite list of candidates. Let see what happens when I create a list of +110 M candidates and feed them to JtR.

Rules PCFG Efficiency
none 9703571 8.8%
wordlist 10815243 9.8%

Efficiency plummets: only 9.7 M hashes cracked with a list of 110398024 candidates, and only 1.1 M more when the set of rules "wordlist" is applied. It's even less beneficial than with a list of 10 M candidates (+1.3 M with "wordlist" rules, compared to "none").

On the result side, both word list with jumbo rules yields to +21 M cracked passwords. But are those passwords identical, or different?

Rules Total unique cracked Yield
none 6013896 83.7%
wordlist 8184166 76.4%
Jumbo 26841735 61.1%
Yield = UniqueCracked / (PcfgCracked + RockyouCracked)

A high yield basically says that you should run both word lists into John. A yield of 50% means that all pwd cracked thanks to PCFG are identical to those cracked with the Rockyou list.

As a conclusion, I would say that the PCFG password guess generator is a very interesting tool, as it provides a way to generate valid candidates pretty easily. You probably still need a proper known passwords corpus to train it.
It's also very efficient with no rules at all, compared to the Rockyou list. That might make it a good tool for very slow hashes when you can't afford to try thousands of mangling rules on each candidate.

Some graphs to illustrate this post:

every john session on the same graph

every john session on the same graph

every session, zoomed on the first 2 minutes

every session, zoomed on the first 2 minutes

Rules "wordlist" on both lists of candidates

Rules "wordlist" on both lists of candidates

Rules "none", both lists of candidates

Rules "none", both lists of candidates

Escaping the Apple ecosystem: part 1

X10SRA-F_specBack in late 2012, I've started to think about my post-Apple days. I knew already that I would not endorse the full cloud crap, and the oversimplification of OS X that follows the iOS convergence. My hardware, my OS, my data.

I'm still running a Mac Pro 2010, with Mac OS X 10.6.8, the last great OS from Apple. Unfortunately (in)security is not what it used to be, and browsers, ssl libraries, etc. are updated frequently and older OSes are no longer supported. So it was time to switch away from 10.6.8 for my online activities. Meaning, it's time to create my multi-headed workstation running various OSes with dedicated GPU.

After about a year spent looking for the right pieces of hardware, I've came up with this BOM:

Hopefully it will yield to great results with virtualization, passthrough of GPUs and USB.
For now, only one GPU, just in case it's not working accordingly. That will allow me to test every OSes I want to use with GPU passthrough. I'll buy 2 more GPUs when it's fully tested and satisfactory.

To do list:

  • Assemble the workstation
  • Install and patch VMWare (to allow the virtualization of Mac OS X on non-Apple hardware)
  • Test each VM with GPU+USB+Sound passthrough

Due to the exotic nature of some of these pieces of hardware, I've had to order them from four retailers in two countries: Amazon (France), LDLC (France), PC-Cooling (Germany) and MindFactory (Germany).

I've got only one delivery problem, for the PC case: it was delivered through GLS Group, and it took them more than a week to drive 10 km from their warehouse to my home. When it finally went through my door, the box was trashed and the PC case had one foot slightly hammered into the case. It can't stand still on its 4 feet.
Whatever you buy abroad, just make sure it won't be delivered through GLS. The driver was a pain in the ass, calling me to delay the delivery.

Monter un serveur d’authentification multifacteur 3/3

insertedDans deux articles précédents j'ai présenté la création d'un serveur de validation YK-VAL et d'un serveur de clé YK-KSM permettant de créer une infrastructure d'authentification double facteur basée sur Yubico OTP.

Dans ce dernier article je vais détailler quelques étapes importantes pour connecter un client, toujours en FreeBSD 10.3. Dans ce contexte, le client est en fait un service authentifié (un serveur sshd par exemple).

Prérequis

À ce stade, posséder une Yubikey dont vous pourrez configurer un des slots est impératif. Il est aussi pertinent de télécharger sur votre poste le Yubikey Personalization Tool. Et il vous faut bien évidemment une machine sous FreeBSD 10.x qui servira de serveur sshd.

Générer une clé d'API

La validation d'une authentification par OTP Yubico requière que l'utilisateur fournisse un OTP reconnu, c'est à dire que sa Yubikey soit enregistrée dans le YK-KSM, et que l'OTP envoyé soit valide. Il est aussi nécessaire que la connexion entre le client (ici sshd+pam) et le serveur YK-VAL soit "authentifiée" par une clé d'API.

Dans l'idéal, chaque client individuel doit disposer de sa propre clé d'API, c'est plus sûr. Et même si cela peut occasionner des lourdeurs, cela permet de révoquer une clé d'API sans mettre par terre l'ensemble des clients.

La première étape pour ajouter un client dans l'infrastructure est donc de créer une clé d'API. Pour cela, il faut se connecter sur le serveur YK-VAL, et lancer la commande suivante :

ykval-gen-clients --urandom --notes "client de test 1"
1,VI5eTtCSAjdmp473G3rWFq+pL1k=

Cette commande vous donne en résultat une clé d'API, associée au client "1". La clé d'API et les informations connexes sont injectées dans la base de données du serveur YK-VAL.

Enregistrer une Yubikey

Chaque Yubikey compatible Yubico OTP dispose de deux slots de configuration. Le premier est réglé par défaut sur Yubico OTP, mais il est impossible d'en extraire la clé privée de chiffrement (configuration d'usine). Cette clé est enregistrée dans le YK-KSM des serveurs yubico.com, donc elle est opérationnelle si vous souhaitez l'utiliser pour vous authentifier sur des services qui s'appuient sur le cloud de yubico.com. Nous souhaitons nous appuyer sur notre propre infrastructure privative, donc cette clé n'est pas utilisable.
Si vous souhaitez conserver cette clé initiale, vous devrez créer une nouvelle clé privée sur le slot 2 de votre Yubikey (et je vous y encourage). Si vous êtes sûr de ne pas en avoir l'usage, vous pouvez simplement écraser le slot 1 de la Yubikey avec votre nouvelle clé privée. Sachez que l'écrasement d'un slot est irréversible : la clé privée fournie par Yubico sera définitivement perdue.

Ceci posé, vous pouvez connecter votre Yubikey à votre machine, et lancer le Yubikey Personalization Tool.
Dans l'interface, choisissez le premier onglet en haut à gauche "Yubico OTP", et cliquez sur "Quick".
La fenêtre ci-dessous est affichée :
- choisissez le slot 1 (écrasement de la configuration d'usine) ou le slot 2 (vierge)
- décochez la case "Hide values"
- copiez précieusement les chaînes de caractères des trois champs, ainsi que le serial number au format décimal ("Dec") qui se trouve au milieu à droite de la fenêtre.

Yubico Personalization Tool

Il s'agit ensuite d'enregistrer ces informations dans la base de données du YK-KSM. Dans le cadre de ces tests, j'ai simplement injecté la clé à la main dans MySQL :

INSERT INTO yubikeys VALUES (4263215,"vvgrneginvdf","","578fba7ca791","fd69d1ecc644f36dde9dfc742cf2e3fa","00000000","",1,1);

Les champs sont dans l'ordre d'apparence : le numéro de série "Dec" de votre clé physique, la date de création (non renseignée), la "Public Identity" de votre clé de chiffrement, la "Private Identity" de votre clé de chiffrement, et enfin la "Secret Key". Les champs suivants sont "lockcode", "creator" (vide), "active" et "hardware". Laissez-les simplement comme présenté ci-dessus.

Dès que vous avez procédé à l'insertion, vous pouvez tester que la clé est bien reconnue par le serveur YK-KSM. Générez un OTP avec votre clé en appuyant un court instant sur le bouton si vous utilisez le slot 1, ou 2-3 secondes si vous utilisez le slot 2 (placez au préalable votre curseur dans un document txt).
Ensuite tapez la commande suivante sur le serveur YK-KSM :

curl 'http://localhost/wsapi/decrypt?otp=vvgrneginvdfddffbdhgefnrdtgcrnntccchndebhdiv'

ou vvgrneginvdfddffbdhgefnrdtgcrnntccchndebhdiv est l'OTP que vient de générer votre clé.
Vous obtiendrez alors la réponse suivante :

OK counter=0001 low=8250 high=45 use=02

Vous pouvez ensuite tester que votre Yubikey passe bien la validation de bout en bout. À partir d'un terminal sur YK-VAL, lancez la commande suivante :

ykclient --url "http://127.0.0.1/wsapi/2.0/verify" --apikey VI5eTtCSAjdmp473G3rWFq+pL1k= 1 vvgrneginvdfihrudhtffnjigivctkujtfjlkiniideg --debug

L'argument --apikey doit être suivi de la clé d'API que vous avez générée plus haut. Elle est suivit d'un espace, puis du numéro d'ID du client que vous avez inséré (et donné dans la sortie de la commande ykval-gen-clients). À la suite de ce client ID, on injecte un OTP, et éventuellement l'argument --debug.

Si tout va bien, vous devez obtenir dans la sortie :

Input:
  validation URL: http://127.0.0.1/wsapi/2.0/verify
  client id: 1
  token: vvgrneginvdfihrudhtffnjigivctkujtfjlkiniideg
  api key: VI5eTtCSAjdmp473G3rWFq+pL1k=
Verification output (0): Success

Configuration du client

Pour brancher un serveur sshd sur une infrastructure d'authentification double facteur, le plus simple est en général d'utiliser un plugin PAM. Sur FreeBSD, on peut en quelques secondes installer le nécessaire :

pkg install pam_yubico

Ce plugin s'appuie sur deux choses : l'URL de votre service YK-VAL, et une liste qui associe les logins des utilisateurs avec une clé ("Public Identity").
Vous pouvez créer le fichier qui associe l'uid UNIX à la "Public Identity" très simplement :

cat "patpro:vvgrneginvdf" >> /etc/yubikey

Puis dans /etc/pam.d/sshd il faut ajouter la directive qui permettra à PAM de faire la requête vers YK-VAL. La ligne suivante doit être ajoutée :

auth      required      /usr/local/lib/security/pam_yubico.so mode=client authfile=/etc/yubikey id=1 key=VI5eTtCSAjdmp473G3rWFq+pL1k= url=http://192.168.0.100/wsapi/2.0/verify?id=%d&otp=%s

juste au dessus de la ligne :

auth      required      pam_unix.so     no_warn try_first_pass

authfile pointe vers votre fichier associant uid et clé OTP, id est la Client ID créée lors de l'ajout du client sur YK-VAL, key est la clé d'API associée à ce client. Pour finir, url est l'adresse du service de vérification sur YK-VAL. On peut tout à fait inscrire le nom du serveur YK-VAL dans l'URL à la place de son adresse IP, néanmoins en cas d'avarie du DNS il est souhaitable que l'authentification continue de fonctionner.

Dernière étape : la configuration du serveur sshd. Il s'agit assez simplement de modifier /etc/ssh/sshd_config pour s'assurer que les paramètres suivants sont actifs :

PasswordAuthentication no
ChallengeResponseAuthentication yes

Relancez ensuite sshd avec la commande service sshd restart et tentez la connexion à partir d'une machine sur laquelle votre Yubikey est connectée :

$ ssh patpro@192.168.0.104
YubiKey for `patpro': 
Password for patpro@test10.patpro.net:
Last login: Fri May  6 21:33:58 2016 from 192.168.0.2
FreeBSD 10.3-RELEASE (GENERIC) #0 r297264: Fri Mar 25 02:10:02 UTC 2016

Welcome to FreeBSD!
...

Enjoy.

Bibliographie

Pour réaliser cette infrastructure privative d'authentification double facteur et les articles qui en découlent, je me suis appuyé sur les sources suivantes :

yubikey-ksm, principes et installation.
yubikey-val, principes et installation.
Building a local Yubikey server infrastructure (sur Linux).
yubico-pam, README.
YubiKey on FreeBSD HOWTO, aspect "client" uniquement, utilisant en plus pam_per_user.

Monter un serveur d’authentification multifacteur 2/3

Dans un article précédent, j'ai présenté les étapes nécessaires à l'installation du serveur de validation YK-VAL de Yubico sur FreeBSD 10.3. Ce serveur s'intègre dans l'infrastructure d'authentification double facteur Yubico selon le schéma ci-dessous.
proposition d'infrastructure YK-VAL YK-KSM

D'autres modèles sont possibles bien évidemment, comme celui qui consiste à mettre les services YK-VAL et YK-KSM sur la même machine.
La suite des opérations consiste à créer le serveur YK-KSM en suivant la documentation officielle de Yubico, et les informations ci-après.

Serveur de clés YK-KSM

Pour assurer la sécurité lors des manipulations de clés, ce serveur est supposé n'utiliser que des fichiers chiffrés via OpenPGP/GnuPG. Aussi, l'outil ykksm-import nécessite-t-il qu'une clé GnuPG soit utilisée pour chiffrer les clés en amont, à leur création sur le poste de l'administrateur par exemple. Il est néanmoins tout à fait possible de ne pas utiliser les commandes ykksm-gen-keys et ykksm-import pour faire fonctionner l'infrastructure d'auth double facteur. Il suffit alors de fournir les clés à la main en les injectant directement dans la table MySQL ad-hoc.

Les étapes supplémentaires liées à OpenPGP n'étant pas complexes à mettre en œuvre, je les présente tout de même.
Il s'agit donc dans un premier temps d'installer gnupg, et de créer une clé maîtresse. Cette clé est utilisée sur le poste qui servira à générer les clés Yubico (ici le serveur lui-même), et sur le serveur YK-KSM pour les déchiffrer au moment de les injecter dans la base de données.

Pour une raison qui m'échappe, le fonctionnement de pinentry-tty est assez hasardeux à l'intérieur d'une Jail, donc si vous souhaitez, comme moi initialement, faire l'installation du service YK-KSM dans une Jail, passez votre chemin, vous gagnerez du temps :)

La partie GnuPG est assez simple :

pkg install gnupg
gpg2 --full-gen-key

Et suivez l'exemple de la doc Yubico. Une fois que votre clé GnuPG est créée, vous pouvez passer à l'installation du service YK-KSM proprement dite.

pkg install git help2man p5-DBI mysql56-server p5-DBD-mysql apache24 mod_php56 php56-xml php56-curl php56-hash php56-pdo_mysql php56-mcrypt
git clone git://github.com/Yubico/yubikey-ksm.git
cd yubikey-ksm

L'utilisation de GIT n'est pas obligatoire, on peut aussi bien télécharger le master.zip à partir de github, comme je l'ai fait pour YK-VAL.
Tout comme pour ce dernier, le Makefile est inexploitable en l'état, j'ai donc eu recours à quelques bricoles pour générer l'environnement adéquat avant d'installer les fichiers à la main :

for DIR in $(awk '/prefix = / {print $3}' Makefile); do
	[ -d $DIR ] || mkdir -p $DIR
done

La commande awk '/prefix = / {print $1"="$3}' Makefile nous donne une série de variables, à laquelle j'ajoute DESTDIR, que l'on fourni ensuite à bash :

etcprefix=/etc/yubico/ksm
binprefix=/usr/bin
phpprefix=/usr/share/yubikey-ksm
docprefix=/usr/share/doc/yubikey-ksm
manprefix=/usr/share/man/man1
wwwprefix=/var/www/wsapi
DESTDIR=/

Cette fois-ci, les commandes ykksm-* utilisables dans le shell sont codées en Perl avec un shebang compatible Linux, pas FreeBSD. On peut faire un lien symbolique de /usr/local/bin/perl vers /usr/bin/perl ou on peut corriger les scripts avant de les installer :

sed -i'.old' 's,/usr/bin/perl,/usr/local/bin/perl,' ykksm-import
sed -i'.old' 's,/usr/bin/perl,/usr/local/bin/perl,' ykksm-gen-keys
sed -i'.old' 's,/usr/bin/perl,/usr/local/bin/perl,' ykksm-export
sed -i'.old' 's,/usr/bin/perl,/usr/local/bin/perl,' ykksm-checksum

Puis on lance la copie des différents éléments :

cp .htaccess ${DESTDIR}${phpprefix}/.htaccess
cp ykksm-decrypt.php ${DESTDIR}${phpprefix}/ykksm-decrypt.php
cp ykksm-utils.php ${DESTDIR}${phpprefix}/ykksm-utils.php
cp ykksm-gen-keys ${DESTDIR}${binprefix}/ykksm-gen-keys
cp ykksm-import ${DESTDIR}${binprefix}/ykksm-import
cp ykksm-export ${DESTDIR}${binprefix}/ykksm-export
cp ykksm-checksum ${DESTDIR}${binprefix}/ykksm-checksum
cp ykksm-config.php ${DESTDIR}${etcprefix}/ykksm-config.php
cp ykksm-gen-keys.1 ${DESTDIR}${manprefix}/ykksm-gen-keys.1
cp ykksm-import.1 ${DESTDIR}${manprefix}/ykksm-import.1
cp ykksm-export.1 ${DESTDIR}${manprefix}/ykksm-export.1
cp ykksm-checksum.1 ${DESTDIR}${manprefix}/ykksm-checksum.1
cp ykksm-db.sql ${DESTDIR}${docprefix}/ykksm-db.sql
cp Makefile ${DESTDIR}${docprefix}/ykksm.mk
cp doc/* ${DESTDIR}${docprefix}/

L'étape suivante est l'installation de la base de données. Suivez simplement les instructions de l'étape 3 de la doc Yubico.

J'ai traité l'étape 4 différemment de ce qui est proposé. J'ai préféré tout mettre dans le fichier .htaccess :

<IfModule mod_php5.c>
  php_value include_path ".:/etc/yubico/ksm:/usr/share/yubikey-ksm"
</IfModule>

RewriteEngine on
RewriteRule ^([^/\.\?]+)(\?.*)?$ $1.php$2 [L]

L'étape 5 se traite exactement de la même manière que pour YK-VAL. Et l'étape 6 se fait simplement en créant les liens symboliques à la main.

À l'étape 7, tout comme pour YK-VAL, on renseigne le mot de passe MySQL dans le fichier de configuration ykksm-config.php.

Ensuite, sous réserve que votre serveur web soit lancé, il ne vous reste qu'à tester que tout fonctionne. Comme indiqué dans la doc, le résultat attendu est une erreur de clé inconnue, ce qui est tout à fait normal.

Fabrication de clés et import dans la base de données

Les vraies clés seront ajoutées ultérieurement. Mais vous pouvez néanmoins tester l'ajout de clés bidons via ykksm-gen-keys et ykksm-import.

La fabrication de 5 clés se fait comme ceci (doc officielle) :

ykksm-gen-keys --urandom 1 5 | gpg -a --encrypt -r 67A59965 -s > keys.txt

où 67A59965 est l'ID de la clé GnuPG fabriquée un peu plus haut.

Ensuite l'import des clés se fait de cette manière (doc officielle) :

ykksm-import --verbose --database 'DBI:mysql:dbname=ykksm;host=localhost' --db-user ykksmimporter --db-passwd mot-de-passe-mysql < keys.txt

Dans un troisième et dernier article il sera question de la partie vraiment intéressante : comment provisionner de vraies clés, et comment brancher un Client YK (un serveur sshd par exemple) sur votre nouvelle infrastructure d'authentification double facteur.